Strange Flower Fly (Rhingia nasica)

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NikonUser
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Strange Flower Fly (Rhingia nasica)

Post by NikonUser »

Image

Note the long snout and the wild-boar-tusks on the proboscis (left one sticking up, right one somewhat flattened).
Diptera: Syrphidae: Rhingia nasica. The only member of the genus in North America. Length 8.5mm.
Face shot: D2Xs + 8cm extension + reversed 28mm @ f8; single SB800 flash, 49 exposures @ 0.05m, HF 4.1

EDIT: title changed
Last edited by NikonUser on Mon Oct 13, 2008 12:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Bizarre creature, very nicely photographed.

How does it use these strange mouthparts?

--Rik

lauriek
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Post by lauriek »

Weird! We have a couple of Rhingia species in the UK, campestris and rostrata. Both have the snout but neither have the tusks as far as I know.

Really nice shot(s)!

I shot one of this genus and found I needed a /lot/ of diffusion on the flashes to avoid the flare on the snout, it's obviously very reflective..

Edited to add: After posting that I wondered whether I'd posted my Rhingia here, and I did, it's here and look, having said I don't think they have the tusks, there they are! Not as obvious in my shot though..

NikonUser
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Post by NikonUser »

rjlittlefield wrote:How does it use these strange mouthparts?--Rik
According to Steve Marshall "Insects Their Natural History and Diversity" (the best book for species identification for insects of eastern North America) the proboscis is housed in the snout; its drops down at right angles when the fly feeds. So my guess is that the wild-boar-tusks are for parking/guiding the proboscis in the snout. Need to see a photo with the proboscis 'parked'.

Ken Ramos
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Post by Ken Ramos »

NikonUser wrote:
"Insects Their Natural History and Diversity" (the best book for species identification for insects of eastern North America)
Got to add that to my "need to get a copy of" list. Thanks! Great images by the way. :wink:

Cyclops
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Post by Cyclops »

Wow interesting fly,and to think most people would just swat it without a thought. But insects are fascinating when seen up close.
Canon 30D | Canon IXUS 265HS | Cosina 100mm f3.5 macro | EF 75-300 f4.5-5.6 USM III | EF 50 f1.8 II | Slik 88 tripod | Apex Practicioner monocular microscope

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