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Another small moth - more shots

 
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Pizzazz



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 446

PostPosted: Sat Jun 22, 2019 8:34 am    Post subject: Another small moth - more shots Reply with quote

Hi Gang

I found this guy on the window sill to my shop. At first I thought it was alive
due to the way it was sitting, but discovered its true state when I went to
catch him in my specimen jar.

He must have passed during the night, as he was still very pliable.

I went to work, spreading the wings and doing some initial cleaning.
He firmed up within 24 hours.


Mike















Tuft of scales at the base of the abdomen



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leonardturner



Joined: 14 Mar 2013
Posts: 507
Location: Atlanta, GA, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 2:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

An excellent set of images. I'm particularly interested in the varying patches of pigmentation in the eye; I wonder what sort of function they would serve.

Leonard
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rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 19887
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good find, well documented!

leonardturner wrote:
I'm particularly interested in the varying patches of pigmentation in the eye; I wonder what sort of function they would serve.

The pattern looks like a pretty typical artifact of the eye drying out and having its innards crack and separate.

In life the whole eye probably appeared uniform near-black.

Of course the pattern says something about the anatomy and the drying process, but I suspect it's about as relevant to vision as cracks in drying mud are to a functioning wetland.

--Rik
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Pizzazz



Joined: 28 Nov 2013
Posts: 446

PostPosted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 10:47 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Leonard

I agree with Rik. Recall that I found this specimen and although still
pliable, the eyes had started to "turn".

In the past I have found that the eyes turn fast and you fight the clock on
getting a good shot.

I am in the process of shooting an Acrea Moth, and its eyes are jet black.
This specimen went down yesterday morning and I will post something
later today so you can compare.

Mike
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Smokedaddy



Joined: 07 Oct 2006
Posts: 1406
Location: Phoenix, Arizona

PostPosted: Sat Jun 29, 2019 11:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Fluffy little critter. Nice image set.
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