www.photomacrography.net :: View topic - Raynox DCR-150 tube assembly with flocking
www.photomacrography.net Forum Index
An online community dedicated to the practices of photomacrography, close-up and macro photography, and photomicrography.
Photomacrography Front Page Amateurmicrography Front Page
Old Forums/Galleries
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 
Raynox DCR-150 tube assembly with flocking
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Macro and Micro Technique and Technical Discussions
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
santiago



Joined: 25 Sep 2018
Posts: 108
Location: Nijmegen, The Netherlands

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lou Jost wrote:
Yesterday swarms of colorful hummingbrids swirled around feeders a meter above my head during dinner...

That does sound like paradise Smile

Great pictures and amazing research on orchids, so many different species in such a small area! Surprised
_________________
Santiago
Flickr
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Lou Jost



Joined: 04 Sep 2015
Posts: 3847
Location: Ecuador

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes Santiago, that is the most interesting thing, the differences between neighboring mountains are surprising. I am in a cloud forest now and have just now spent the afternoon looking for four new orchid species I had discovered several years ago, before I knew about focuss stacking. This evening I will try to make some stacks of them here in the cabin I'm staying in. They are very small flowers, 2-5mm across.

This morning I watched a bird that was only discovered 20 years ago, the Jocotoco Antpitta. The reserve I am staying at was set up for this species.
_________________
Lou Jost
www.ecomingafoundation.wordpress.com
www.loujost.com
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
hero



Joined: 17 Jul 2017
Posts: 71
Location: California

PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 4:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Okay so I'm having a really bad day for other reasons, so forgive me in advance if I am out of line....

I'm frustrated.

Here's what I have so far:

Mitutoyo BD Plan 10x
M40x36tpi to M52 (male or female) adapter
Raynox DCR-150
Canon EF mount camera
flocking paper

What I need at a bare minimum, as far as I'm able to tell, are:
Extension tubes
Step-up/step down rings that depend on extension tube diameter
EF mount adapter

What I may also need are:
Variable extension tube to adjust spacing between objective and tube lens
Additional adapters

My frustration comes from the fact that I don't know where to get the parts I still need. I am concerned that an M42 tube will be too narrow to provide coverage of the FF sensor, so I've been looking for something at least 48 mm diameter, preferably 52, but I can't find these. I see 2" diameter SM2 tubes on Thorlabs, but these are expensive and I am not sure about adapters for these. On top of this, I noticed yesterday that there are a lot of specks inside the BD Plan objective I bought from Robert. I don't know if it's dust or something else, and I hope it doesn't affect the image quality, but it is disturbing to me and all the more so because I can't test it out. I haven't had it long enough to think it's mold. I've barely handled it.

I also saw some 2" tubes from Astromania on Amazon, but again, no idea how these work in terms of thread pitch. I believe step-up/down ring sets might come in handy to adapt the Raynox. But other than this, I'm completely stuck and I need help. I've read through the FAQs, spent hours online searching for parts to no avail. All anyone ever seems to say is that these things are "on eBay" somewhere.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20182
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hero wrote:
I am concerned that an M42 tube will be too narrow to provide coverage of the FF sensor

M42 tubes will be no problem on FF if kept away from the camera, as shown in the first post in this thread.

Quote:
I've read through the FAQs, spent hours online searching for parts to no avail. All anyone ever seems to say is that these things are "on eBay" somewhere.

They're also on Amazon (as mentioned in the first post). I've annotated the list from my first post, giving current Amazon links found by searching just now. Please double-check to see that these match the specifications. Many of the parts are available from multiple listings so you have some flexibility in trading off $$ against delivery time.

Quote:
By the numbers, these parts are:

1. macro extension tube set with bayonet mount to fit camera https://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Canon-Extension-Extreme-Close-Ups/dp/B003Y60DZO
2. bayonet-to-M42 (42mm x 1.0mm thread) lens mount adapter https://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Lens-Mount-Adapter-Camera/dp/B001G4QXN2
3. M42 extension tubes (two sets) https://www.amazon.com/Fotodiox-Macro-Extension-Screw-Mount/dp/B008BBI4DA
4. M42 to 52mm adapter ring https://www.amazon.com/Female-M42-M52-Step-Up-Coupling-Adapter/dp/B07F86GX33
5. 52mm-52mm male-male reverse adapter ring https://www.amazon.com/Pixco-52mm-52mm-Coupler-Reverse-Adapter/dp/B00G0JOJK2
6. 49mm to 52mm "step up" ring (49mm male, 52mm female, used in reverse to fit the 49mm female threads on the normal front of the Raynox) https://www.amazon.com/49-52MM-Step-Up-Accessory-MagicFiber-Cleaning/dp/B00496G4KG
7. Raynox DCR-150 lens, reversed (you have this)
8. 52mm to 43mm "step down" ring (52mm male, 43mm female, used in reverse to fit the 43mm male threads on the normal rear of the Raynox) https://www.amazon.com/Fotga-Black-52mm-52mm-43mm-Filter/dp/B009T1CO0U
9. 55mm to 52mm "step down" ring with through threads, used here as a 52mm-52mm female-female reverse adapter https://www.amazon.com/Metal-Female-Coupling-Adapter-Filter/dp/B07FM3QDG7 (an actual coupler instead of step-down with through threads)
10. (optional) 52mm to M42 adapter ring (52mm male, M42 female) https://www.amazon.com/Female-M52-M42-Step-Down-Coupling-Adapter/dp/B07F8DV234
11. (optional) M42 to 52mm adapter ring (M42 male, 52mm female) https://www.amazon.com/Female-M42-M52-Step-Up-Coupling-Adapter/dp/B07F86GX33 (same as #4)
12. 52mm to objective thread adapter (52mm male, objective thread female) (you have this)

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20182
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2019 8:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Update: since I posted the DIY solution, two Chinese suppliers have come out with off-the-shelf packages that provide elegant engineered solutions:

https://www.wemacro.com/?product=raynox-dcr-150-tube-lens-pro

https://www.mjkzz.de/products/variable-tube-system-bundle-with-raynox-dcr-150?variant=29060380164211

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
mawyatt



Joined: 22 Aug 2013
Posts: 2230
Location: Clearwater

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2019 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rik,

I have both sets of tubes and clamps, but not the complete kits as I already had the Raynox 150 and 250. I've been using them for some time now and can say they both are very nice.

The tubes in the MJKZZ are the standard extension tubes but of higher quality than you can generally get on eBay unless you know the vendor. I already had a bunch of these and most were very sloppy fit, the Nikon F mount adapter & lens adapter were mostly loose and had to hand pick the better ones and toss the rest. MJKZZ are better tubes & Nikon adapters than I had generally found on eBay.

The Wemacro tubes appear to be custom designed and more inline with the Thor type tubes with a smooth surface and beautifully machined with a standard 42mm thread.

You can't go wrong with either setup IMO.

Best,
_________________
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20182
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2019 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Excellent, thanks for the info. I have not held either set in my hands, so it's great to get confirmation from somebody who has.

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
mawyatt



Joined: 22 Aug 2013
Posts: 2230
Location: Clearwater

PostPosted: Thu Oct 17, 2019 12:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rik,

I don't use any of my older tube lens setups anymore, I've switched to these because they have much better lens support with the multiple clamps, which BTW are both beautifully machined. The MJKZZ clamps are ~12mm thick and the Wemacro are ~15.5mm thick.

The MJKZZ main body is comprised of standard extension tube sections in 28, 14 and 7mm sections. The Wemacro is based upon 50mm and 10mm sections of a custom tube (I think), but are very reasonable priced for additional extensions.

Best,
_________________
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
cmagno



Joined: 08 Oct 2012
Posts: 53
Location: Porto, Portugal

PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2019 3:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi mawyatt,

mawyatt wrote:
I don't use any of my older tube lens setups anymore, I've switched to these because they have much better lens support with the multiple clamps, which BTW are both beautifully machined. The MJKZZ clamps are ~12mm thick and the Wemacro are ~15.5mm thick.

The MJKZZ main body is comprised of standard extension tube sections in 28, 14 and 7mm sections. The Wemacro is based upon 50mm and 10mm sections of a custom tube (I think), but are very reasonable priced for additional extensions.

Best,


You needed to do any extra flocking with any of the solutions presented here?

Best regards,
Carlos Magno
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
mawyatt



Joined: 22 Aug 2013
Posts: 2230
Location: Clearwater

PostPosted: Mon Oct 21, 2019 5:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

cmagno wrote:
Hi mawyatt,

mawyatt wrote:
I don't use any of my older tube lens setups anymore, I've switched to these because they have much better lens support with the multiple clamps, which BTW are both beautifully machined. The MJKZZ clamps are ~12mm thick and the Wemacro are ~15.5mm thick.

The MJKZZ main body is comprised of standard extension tube sections in 28, 14 and 7mm sections. The Wemacro is based upon 50mm and 10mm sections of a custom tube (I think), but are very reasonable priced for additional extensions.

Best,


You needed to do any extra flocking with any of the solutions presented here?

Best regards,
Carlos Magno


Hi Carlos,

The Wemacro tubes come with the flocking already installed in each section. I don't think the MJKZZ tubes come with any flocking, so you will need to add this.

Sometimes it's a good idea to flock in backside of the adapters mounted on the tube sections, especially the lens objective adapter which has a large flat reflective surface.

Anodized aluminum, even black, is very reflective and needs to be flocked if the surface can be "seen" by the camera sensor.

Best,
_________________
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
Deanimator



Joined: 23 Oct 2012
Posts: 802
Location: Rocky River, Ohio, U.S.A.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 30, 2019 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mawyatt wrote:
cmagno wrote:
Hi mawyatt,

mawyatt wrote:
I don't use any of my older tube lens setups anymore, I've switched to these because they have much better lens support with the multiple clamps, which BTW are both beautifully machined. The MJKZZ clamps are ~12mm thick and the Wemacro are ~15.5mm thick.

The MJKZZ main body is comprised of standard extension tube sections in 28, 14 and 7mm sections. The Wemacro is based upon 50mm and 10mm sections of a custom tube (I think), but are very reasonable priced for additional extensions.

Best,


You needed to do any extra flocking with any of the solutions presented here?

Best regards,
Carlos Magno


Hi Carlos,

The Wemacro tubes come with the flocking already installed in each section. I don't think the MJKZZ tubes come with any flocking, so you will need to add this.

Sometimes it's a good idea to flock in backside of the adapters mounted on the tube sections, especially the lens objective adapter which has a large flat reflective surface.

Anodized aluminum, even black, is very reflective and needs to be flocked if the surface can be "seen" by the camera sensor.

Best,


You have to hand it to Wemacro. They rarely let grass grow under their feet. Initiative like that is rare these days.
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message
dhmiller



Joined: 11 Nov 2019
Posts: 71

PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 5:33 pm    Post subject: Re: Raynox DCR-150 tube assembly with flocking Reply with quote

How did you insure that the flocking materials stayed bound to the inner walls of the tubes, and did you connect all the tubes first then insert the flocking material inside, or did you start with one tube, insert the material (with the end of it sticking out), then add each tube in turn?

rjlittlefield wrote:
From time to time people ask how to mount a Raynox DCR-150 for use as a tube lens with microscope objectives.

Here is one scheme that works well and is made entirely of off-the-shelf extension tubes and adapter rings, plus some DIY flocking.



By the numbers, these parts are:

1. macro extension tube set with bayonet mount to fit camera
2. bayonet-to-M42 (42mm x 1.0mm thread) lens mount adapter
3. M42 extension tubes (two sets)
4. M42 to 52mm adapter ring
5. 52mm-52mm male-male reverse adapter ring
6. 49mm to 52mm "step up" ring (49mm male, 52mm female, used in reverse to fit the 49mm female threads on the normal front of the Raynox)
7. Raynox DCR-150 lens, reversed
8. 52mm to 43mm "step down" ring (52mm male, 43mm female, used in reverse to fit the 43mm male threads on the normal rear of the Raynox)
9. 55mm to 52mm "step down" ring with through threads, used here as a 52mm-52mm female-female reverse adapter
10. (optional) 52mm to M42 adapter ring (52mm male, M42 female)
11. (optional) M42 to 52mm adapter ring (M42 male, 52mm female)
12. 52mm to objective thread adapter (52mm male, objective thread female)

Parts #10 and 11, the two rings labeled "optional", are mainly to provide a few mm of extra separation between the objective and the Raynox DCR-150. Some tests have show that this makes a slight improvement in image quality.

Note: it is critical that you add flocking or baffles to kill reflections from the sides of the tubes and rings. Failing to do this can severely degrade image quality!

The most reliable way to see reflections is to simply point the assembly at a bright light, stick your eye where the camera sensor will be, and look for any bright rings surrounding the central aperture.

For illustration, here is a setup that uses a small camera to do the looking (with an extra set of tubes to block out external light). You can see in the live view on the back of the camera that this assembly has a lot of reflections that have to be killed.



Here is a test target to show the effect of glare. It consists of a white card with a hole poked in it, the hole exposing the interior of a closed box lined with black flocking. It's pretty safe to say that only an insignificant amount of light is actually coming out of that hole.



Shown here is the pattern of reflections, the image captured by the camera, and the histogram of that image. You can see that one set of reflections (from the M42 tubes) is responsible for overall veiling glare that would kill contrast in dark areas, while a large ring of reflections (from the bayonet mount at camera) is responsible for a bright ring around the outside of the field. (This was shot using a full-frame Nikon D800E camera. Full-frame Nikons are particularly vulnerable to the second problem because the mounting bayonet has a small diameter compared to the sensor dimensions.)



Here is the flocking used to eliminate the reflections shown above. The thin strip covers the mount ring at the camera, and the larger panel covers the entire inside of the string of M42 tubes. I used black Doodlebug cardstock . An alternative material is Protostar self adhesive fabric; there is also a newer Protostar sheet material that looks quite good but I have not worked with it yet. Both are available HERE.



In addition to these two sheets of flocking, I also added a circular sheet of flocking on the back of the objective adapter, to kill any reflections bouncing back off the Raynox. And just for completeness, I put a small dot of flocking on the end of a registration pin at the outer bayonet of the first set of tubes, which was responsible for the small isolated bright spot shown in the second row of the panel of reflections. Probably it was too small to visibly matter, but it was simple to eliminate just to be safe.

One more detail... Some extension tubes have bayonet fittings that do not fit as tightly as I would like. But in this tube assembly, it's very simple and effective to epoxy the M42 adapter (part #2) against the bayonet of the extension tubes (part #1). That leaves the entire tube assembly composed of screw threads, which are quite rigid.

As of this writing (Sept 2017), all of the parts here can be ordered from Amazon, except for the objective adapter which comes from an eBay vendor, and the flocking material. Total cost including the Raynox is about $170 plus tax, with shipping inside the U.S.

I hope this helps.

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 20182
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

dhmiller wrote:
How did you insure that the flocking materials stayed bound to the inner walls of the tubes, and did you connect all the tubes first then insert the flocking material inside, or did you start with one tube, insert the material (with the end of it sticking out), then add each tube in turn?

The flocking material that I used has a heavy card stock backing. I carefully cut the two pieces shown in the illustration to be exactly the right size to fit tightly inside the tube assembly when the cut edges were butted against each other. I inserted the flocking by rolling it so the cut edges overlapped to make a smaller tube of flocking that would fit inside the metal tubes. Then I finished the installation by pressing the flocking out against the sides of the metal tubes, essentially forcing the flocking to be a larger cylinder, until the cut edges "clicked" into place so that they butted instead of overlapped. At that point the flocking becomes not quite a perfect cylinder, but rather an almost cylindrical shape that exerts quite a bit of side pressure against the tube. It won't fall out in normal use, but it can be easily removed if necessary.

The dot of flocking on the end of the little pin was glued. The flat circle of flocking at the far end was cut to size and pressed into the recess in the adapter.

In this case I first assembled the tubes that needed to be flocked, then cut and inserted the flocking. When I was flocking the M42 tubes, there was nothing screwed on either end of those.

--Rik
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
dhmiller



Joined: 11 Nov 2019
Posts: 71

PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Rik, Would self-adhesive flocking "tape" also work?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Smokedaddy



Joined: 07 Oct 2006
Posts: 1476
Location: Phoenix, Arizona

PostPosted: Wed Nov 13, 2019 8:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Since I haven't dove into this sort of setup yet, will it work fine on a Canon APS-C type sensor instead of a FF?
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    www.photomacrography.net Forum Index -> Macro and Micro Technique and Technical Discussions All times are GMT - 7 Hours
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Page 3 of 5

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group