DIY microscope: Lego, 3D printing, Arduinos, Raspberry Pi

A forum to ask questions, post setups, and generally discuss anything having to do with photomacrography and photomicroscopy.

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rjlittlefield
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DIY microscope: Lego, 3D printing, Arduinos, Raspberry Pi

Post by rjlittlefield »

Brought to my attention this morning by IEEE Spectrum:

https://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/han ... spberry-pi

Quoting from the start of the article:
Build A Sophisticated Microscope Using Lego, 3D Printing, Arduinos, and a Raspberry Pi
A DIY experiment at IBM Research–Europe became a valuable tool
By Yuksel Temiz

I am a member of a team at IBM Research–Europe, in Zurich, developing microfluidic technologies for medical applications. Two years ago, I was asked to provide high-quality photos and videos of our microfluidic chips for a big tech event. I borrowed a 4K camcorder from a colleague, attached a macro lens to it, built a custom light diffuser using an LED matrix and polyester film, and positioned everything using a high-end tripod and a few micromanipulators. I was able to take eye-catching videos as liquids filled microfluidic channels. It was clear to me that this should be the new level of quality and style for our publications and presentations. However, my photo setup occupied half a bench in our lab and it required hours of fine adjustments to record one shot.

We have a tradition of inventing microscopes at IBM in Zurich. In 1981, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer created the scanning tunneling microscope here. As a DIY enthusiast, I quickly found myself in my own quest to build a better setup. The result was a US $300 modular and motorized microscope that combines my three favorite adulthood hobbies: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Lego.
--Rik

Edit: to fix formatting problem introduced by forum software upgrade

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Post by Smokedaddy »


TheLostVertex
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Post by TheLostVertex »

Interesting project, and given the timing. Yesterday a new raspberry pi camera module was released, https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/ra ... ty-camera/ and product specs https://static.raspberrypi.org/files/pr ... _Brief.pdf

From what I gather its max resolution is 4056 x 3040 with a 7.9mm diagonal size(not spec'd, but I am assuming then the sensor is 6.3 x 4.7mm) and uses a C mount.

mawyatt
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Post by mawyatt »

Steven,

Saw this new camera as well. Seems like a possible use with the RPi, maybe the new version 4, and a stacking controller based upon the Trinamic motor controllers could produce a complete "Integrated Stack & Stitch System" with camera and lens. Add 3 rails with stepper motors and one could have a nice little S&S system for a very modest cost, even could include an LED controller for Modeling and Flash use (all the pieces are already done).

Something worth looking into IMO for those DIYers.

Best,
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

mawyatt
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Location: Clearwater

Re: DIY microscope: Lego, 3D printing, Arduinos, Raspberry P

Post by mawyatt »

rjlittlefield wrote:Brought to my attention this morning by IEEE Spectrum:

https://spectrum.ieee.org/geek-life/han ... spberry-pi

Quoting from the start of the article:
Build A Sophisticated Microscope Using Lego, 3D Printing, Arduinos, and a Raspberry Pi
A DIY experiment at IBM Research–Europe became a valuable tool
By Yuksel Temiz

I am a member of a team at IBM Research–Europe, in Zurich, developing microfluidic technologies for medical applications. Two years ago, I was asked to provide high-quality photos and videos of our microfluidic chips for a big tech event. I borrowed a 4K camcorder from a colleague, attached a macro lens to it, built a custom light diffuser using an LED matrix and polyester film, and positioned everything using a high-end tripod and a few micromanipulators. I was able to take eye-catching videos as liquids filled microfluidic channels. It was clear to me that this should be the new level of quality and style for our publications and presentations. However, my photo setup occupied half a bench in our lab and it required hours of fine adjustments to record one shot.

We have a tradition of inventing microscopes at IBM in Zurich. In 1981, Gerd Binnig and Heinrich Rohrer created the scanning tunneling microscope here. As a DIY enthusiast, I quickly found myself in my own quest to build a better setup. The result was a US $300 modular and motorized microscope that combines my three favorite adulthood hobbies: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Lego.

--Rik


Rik,

IBM Zurich should have asked IBM Burlington about getting the chip images, this was done starting back in ~2008 for chips in their foundry process. However IBM Burlington is no longer part of IBM, they were acquired by Global Foundries in 2014, so Zurich probably doesn't know about this.

Interesting article.

Best,
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

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