Viewing water flow instead of a slide?

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JG
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Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 11:56 am

Viewing water flow instead of a slide?

Post by JG »

Hi! :)

Instead of having to prepare and examine one slide at a time, is there some way to have water flowing trough a transparent pipe so that it could be recorded on video?
Thank you!

Peace,

JG

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

JG, welcome aboard!

What do you need to see in the water? This will affect magnification, flow rate, and so on.

When you do prepare a slide, what magnification and illumination works well for you?

--Rik

gpmatthews
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Post by gpmatthews »

Camlab microslides are optically flat capillary tubes that could be used to observe flowing water. I have used them for immersion in ponds and collection a few weeks later to inspect what has grown inside.

See:

http://www.camlab.co.uk/item.asp?itemid ... egoryid=11

...not cheap, though!
Graham

Though we lean upon the same balustrade, the colours of the mountain are different.

JG
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 11:56 am

Post by JG »

Hi there! :)

Thank you for your replies!
I want to examine diatomaceae on flowing water, on the field (storing the video). I will have to wait till Spring because everything is frozen now but I want to prepare in advance.
Camlab microslides seem to be the solution! The price is high but they come in quantities that should last for a long time.
I am not sure if my idea will work because, even if we can figure out a way to get constant flow and illumination, there will be deposition...
Still, it is always worth trying. I will share the results, even if they are not satisfactory, of course.
Thank you! Stay warm! ;)

Peace,
JG

ChrisR
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Post by ChrisR »

a way to get constant flow
Could be a peristaltic pump, as often used in air-conditioning equipment.

JG
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Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 11:56 am

Post by JG »

Hi! :)
Thank you for your replies!
You guys are amazing! Those are all excellent ideas.
I am thinking about welding 2 pipes, they are Borosilicate glass, into an L-shape to feed in one side and with an open end on the other side to dispose of the sample. This might work...
Thank you! Take care!

JG

Juergen Boschert
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Post by Juergen Boschert »

Hi,

may be this could be another posibility for you:

http://www.micro-life.de/anwendung.htm


The English explanation is in the middle of the page.

Regards.

JB

Chris S.
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Post by Chris S. »

You might want to do a Web search on the word "microfluidics." I see that it turns up quite bit of good info.

Over the past couple of years, several microfluidics researchers have shown me their work, and some of it uses simple, inexpensive techniques that cost pennies per copy, are very adaptable, and have dealt with issues like deposition, creation and gating of flow, and using tube size and arrangement to facilitate movement of particles in a chosen size range.

Sorry for not being more specific, but I viewed these projects under a non-disclosure agreement. However, there is quite a bit openly available on microfluidics. While some of it is high tech and expensive, there are some useful, cheap approaches out there as well that would work for do-it-yourself projects.

Cheers,

--Chris

JG
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Post by JG »

Hei! :)
Micro-life would be nice to try but they referred me to an authorized dealer and I wonder if the dealer will sell one, let's see...
Google got plenty of interesting hits for "microfluidics", unfortunately I couldn't find any inexpensive tubing and fittings.
All I could find were some DIY solutions with a silicone paste which are better than using a propane torch but not perfect.
We're making a lot of progress here! The only missing part is a good way to connect the "microfluidic section" with the "exterior world".
Thank you for your help!

Peace,

JG

ChrisR
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Post by ChrisR »

to connect the "microfluidic section" with the "exterior world".
Hypodermic syringe?
What size are you working at?
I use a lot of 4mm silicone tube..

For a constant flow, excuse the sketch, it's a doodle really... I hope you see what I mean. I do apologise if this is perfectly obvious to you already - it's always hard to guess... ;)
Image
The flow is determined by height h divided by resistance r, as long as the resistance of the outlet, er, f :oops: is small compared to r .
W is waste.
The resistance might be easier to set up as a "pinch" on a tube, as in a hospital Drip.

JG
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Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2010 11:56 am

Post by JG »

Hei there! :)
Thank you for the ideas!
Chris, that's a quite nice picture! The syringe is a great idea!
I was going to use a lab peristaltic pump but the tubing is 0.8mm with an internal diameter of 0.4mm... This kind of equipment is not for outdoors use!
So, I will try aquarium equipment, if the pump is located after the outlet, it won't contaminate it. The standard "aquarium" tubing is 6mm and the valves, fittings, splitters, etc... are very cheap! It will easily connect to lab equipment, it seems like it.

Peace,

JG

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