Papilio ulysses

Images taken in a controlled environment or with a posed subject. All subject types.

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Guppy
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Papilio ulysses

Post by Guppy »

Some light and color in everyday life.
On the underside of the wing, the variety of different scales
in the Odysseus moth is somewhat larger.

Image

Kamera: Nikon D810
Objektiv: NIKON M Plan, 60/0.7 ELWD, 210/0
Belichtungszeit: Blitz
ISO: 250
Beleuchtung: 4 Blitzgeräte
Aufnahmedateiformat (RAW/JPG): RAW
Beschnittsbetrag in % (Breite u. Höhe): 6, 0
Stativ: Reprostand
Aufnahmedatum: 20.01.2020
Herkunft: Nachlass
Artenname: Papilio ulysses
-Infos zu Multishot-Techniken: Stack
Stacking Software / - Methode: Zerene Stacker / PMax
Abbildungsmassstab: 60:1
Objektseitige Bildbreite (mm): 0.56
Stacktiefe (mm): 0.06
Anzahl Stackschritte: 120 (pro Schritt 2 Bilder = Total 240)
Stackschrittgrösse (mm): 0.000496

Here in higher resolution:
http://files.homepagemodules.de/b649264 ... gGYQFu.jpg

Kurt
Last edited by Guppy on Tue Jan 21, 2020 7:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

BugEZ
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Post by BugEZ »

Guppy,

Fine work here! The detailed image you linked shows off the spectacular beauty of the scale lattice structure. Very nice work!

Keith

Olympusman
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Scales

Post by Olympusman »

Outstanding detail!

Mike
Michael Reese Much FRMS EMS Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA

Macro_Cosmos
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Post by Macro_Cosmos »

This is insanely good!
I read in your settings that HDR is mentioned, did you actually do an HDR? Since the white scales aren't blown out and the brown ones are clearly visible, I guess it's indeed an HDR.

Either way, well done!

Guppy
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Post by Guppy »

Marco, sorry
it's not an HDR or stitch, it's just a stack.
A 14 bit RAW image has a sufficiently large contrast area
Kurt

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

That is stunning!!!!!!!

ChrisR
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Post by ChrisR »

Super picture. :D
Why did you take 2 images per step?
Chris R

Guppy
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Post by Guppy »

Hello Chris

0.000496mm is the shortest step that the StackShot can take.
The steps are measured very unevenly and sometimes they go back.
Since I work for photography on the repro stand and not on the microscope, I have tremors. Even if the StackShott doesn't take a step, the focus changes.
If I take several pictures in one step of the StackShot, they are not identical.
If I take 2 pictures, or more with each step of the StackShot, the step size is smaller.
This does not increase the resolution, but the picture becomes sharper and clearer.

Kurt

Lou Jost
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Post by Lou Jost »

If you need more stability and smaller step sizes, you might want to switch to a focus-block setup like mine:

https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/ ... 705#257705

By the way, I liked your picture here so much that I just bought a similar objective, though mine will be the BD version of the ELWD 60x 0.70. I also accidentally found a Nikon 60mm 0.80 210/0 for $89 so I got that too, who could resist that?

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Guppy wrote:0.000496mm is the shortest step that the StackShot can take.
The steps are measured very unevenly and sometimes they go back.
Be sure to set your StackShot into High Precision mode, for the reasons discussed at https://www.photomacrography.net/forum/ ... hp?t=16323 .

I have never seen a StackShot move backward in the middle of a sequence, so I'm guessing the observation that steps sometimes go back is caused by catching a tremor in the repro stand at the wrong time.

--Rik

Guppy
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Post by Guppy »

Hello Rik

With such small steps, I always use high precision mode.
I stack vertically, from the bottom up and move about 3-4 kg with it.
Maybe the StackShot sometimes falls behind?

Kurt

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Post by rjlittlefield »

Guppy wrote:I stack vertically, from the bottom up and move about 3-4 kg with it.
I have not tested the StackShot with such a heavy load.

In general, bottom up is the right way. That way the screw is constantly pushing upward against a strong force. If you were moving top down, then with such a heavy load it could happen that sometimes the rail had to get pushed by the screw and sometimes it would just fall under load. That would produce huge problems.
Maybe the StackShot sometimes falls behind?
Could be. The screw should always be turning forward, but maybe if there's some dust that moves around, the nut could fall back sometimes. Or if the thrust bearings had enough irregularity, the screw could fall downward even though it is turning forward.

How large are the backward steps? How does that compare to the differences you see between two shots at the same position? Have you noticed any periodicity or are the backward steps completely random?

--Rik

Guppy
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Post by Guppy »

The steps are measured very unevenly and sometimes they go back.
Since I work for photography on the repro stand and not on the microscope, I have tremors. Even if the StackShott doesn't take a step, the focus changes.
If I take several pictures in one step of the StackShot, they are not identical.
For me it is primarily interesting how big the steps are at home and not in the laboratory.
As mentioned, there is vibration at my repro stand, which can be responsible for a back.
Even if the StackShott doesn't take a step, the focus changes, + - 0.0002mm.
If someone closes a door in the house or a truck drives past, it can be up to + - 0.001mm.

As you can see in the picture, none of this is a problem

Kurt

Bob-O-Rama
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Re: Papilio ulysses

Post by Bob-O-Rama »

That is just amazing, especially the veins / checking on the iridescent blue ones. Just a thought for the multiple shots discussion, a rheological lubricant will reduce static friction which otherwise results in seizing and lurching.

mawyatt
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Post by mawyatt »

Kurt,

I think you are pushing the limits of what the typical commercial focus rails can do. The Stackshot focus rail I had was pretty good, but like the other commercial rails from Wemacro and MJKZZ, had some backlash and wobble (side to side movement). This became more of an issue at high magnifications and resolution like your involved with.

Could the backing up be caused by the rail not moving when commanded, then jumping forward after another move command or two, thus appearing to be backing up? I've seen this effect before and it might be caused by many things, including controller waveform irregularity/distortion, static friction in the rail bearings and even the reduction of incremental torque during micro-stepping as has been actively discussed in another thread.

My experience with the surplus THK KR type rails, they show none of these rail effects including backlash and rail wobble.

Absolutely beautiful image BTW!!

Best,
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

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