Various slightly weird insects

Images of undisturbed subjects in their natural environment. All subject types.

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MarkSturtevant
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Various slightly weird insects

Post by MarkSturtevant »

A tiny 'minnow mayfly' (Callibaetis sp.) Females look ordinary, but males have these weird eyes. The upward facing eyes are thought to be used to look for passing females.
ImageMinnow mayfly by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Here is another one.
ImageMinnow mayfly by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

A broad-headed bug nymph. These Hemipterans are seed feeders, I think with different species prefering the seeds of a narrow range of host plants. This one is Alydus eurinus, and it is common on a kind of weed - I don't know the ID. The adult insects look pretty ordinary, but the nymphs are very good ant mimics. This one is mimicking a common black carpenter ant. Other species of broad-headed bug nymphs will mimic other ant species with very impressive fidelity. Ant mimics tend to also behave like ants, and so these nymphs move quickly and erratically. But the adults are slow and placid.
ImageBroad headed bug by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

When I first saw this moth I was not sure what the heck I was looking at. Obviously a very serious dead leaf mimic. Its the dark-spotted palthis moth, Palthis angulalis.
ImageDark-spotted palthis moth by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

Many inchworms are super hard to ID. But there is no mistaking the horned spanworm (Nematocampa resistaria). The tendrils will curl or extend, depending on their mood.
ImageHorned spanworm by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

There are several species of tree crickets in my area. But this deeply melanistic one is is my favorite (Oecanthus sp.)
ImageMale snowy tree cricket by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr

I will close with this beetle larva (Neochlamisus sp.), which is a species in the large family of leaf beetles (Chrysomelidae). The larva of this particular species makes a protective case out of its own poo.
ImageCase-bearing beetle larva by Mark Sturtevant, on Flickr
The larvae are common and hard to miss. But what of the adult beetle? Those are famous mimics of caterpillar poo (!), and so I've probably seen plenty of them but have not realized it. Here is one: https://bugguide.net/node/view/1279808

Thanks for looking!
Mark Sturtevant
Dept. of Still Waters

rjlittlefield
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Re: Various slightly weird insects

Post by rjlittlefield »

A well photographed and very informative collection -- thanks!

--Rik

Olympusman
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Re: Various slightly weird insects

Post by Olympusman »

It's interesting that the first Mayfly has the ocelli under the eyes.

Mike
Michael Reese Much FRMS EMS Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, USA

MarkSturtevant
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Re: Various slightly weird insects

Post by MarkSturtevant »

That's true! Have not thought of it. They also don't seem to have much in the way of mouthparts,since they probably don't eat.
Mark Sturtevant
Dept. of Still Waters

Beatsy
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Location: Malvern, UK

Re: Various slightly weird insects

Post by Beatsy »

Very interesting set - well shot, as always. The Minnow nymph looks a bit more than "slightly" weird to me though.

From what you said, it certainly brings a new perspective to "eyeing up the ladies" :D

Adalbert
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Re: Various slightly weird insects

Post by Adalbert »

very nice :smt038

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