First ever shot with Micro Nikkor f2.8 55mm AF-S

Images of undisturbed subjects in their natural environment. All subject types.

Moderators: Pau, rjlittlefield, ChrisR, Chris S.

Aussie Phil
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:53 pm

First ever shot with Micro Nikkor f2.8 55mm AF-S

Post by Aussie Phil »

Well I just received the first of two 55mm F2.8 AF-S Micro Nikkors I bought on eBay for my D7200.

This one is #37****, which makes it what, somewhere in the late '70s early '80s? I have another one coming that is mid 4*****. Both were very cheap.

Whatever, this one is in mint condition with very clear optics, a lovely smooth focus and clean diaphragm. Extremely happy with it. It's a bit like owning a legend. :-)

So these two shots were the very first I took of what (I think) is a rather hairy aphid, on the creeper on my back deck. A bit embarrassed to post it here as my first image post, but one has to start somewhere; someone may be able to identify it for me at least.

Shot at F8 at 1:1 with a 27.5mm PK-13 extension tube, hefty crop.

Aphid is about 2.5-3mm long?

Thanks for looking.


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ChrisR
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Location: Near London, UK

Post by ChrisR »

Congrats, Phil, you've got yourself a brilliant lens, and it obviously works!
40 years on, and you won't beat it easily or by much.

Get a cheap reverse adapter for it and you can use it for somewhat closer than 1:1, too.
It'll fill your senor's pixels well enough to make a very impressive big print.
Even at 1:1, your Depth of Field is so shallow you could try stacking.
Cheap Chinese rails are OK for that - steps around half a millimetre.
There are free stacking programs well worth a try.

That's an interesting beast, I'm tempted to guess, but mustn't.
Chris R

rjlittlefield
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Post by rjlittlefield »

Phil, welcome to image posting! The images look great.

I think your subject is not a true aphid, but one of the (many) related plant hoppers. I don't know your fauna well enough to get closer. The long fibers will be wax, extruded from the cuticle of the insect mostly for defensive purposes.

--Rik

Aussie Phil
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:53 pm

Post by Aussie Phil »

ChrisR wrote:Congrats, Phil, you've got yourself a brilliant lens, and it obviously works!
40 years on, and you won't beat it easily or by much.

Get a cheap reverse adapter for it and you can use it for somewhat closer than 1:1, too.
It'll fill your senor's pixels well enough to make a very impressive big print.
Even at 1:1, your Depth of Field is so shallow you could try stacking.
Cheap Chinese rails are OK for that - steps around half a millimetre.
There are free stacking programs well worth a try.

That's an interesting beast, I'm tempted to guess, but mustn't.
Well, it was advice from this forum that put me onto this old micro Nikkor, so I'm grateful for that.

My early macro work in the 1960's involved mostly flowers using Ihagee Exakta gear with Zeiss Jena optics, so getting into Nikon dlsr gear and stacking software is quite a jump. :-)

I have a reverse adaptor coming; it may well arrive today. I also have a two axis focusing rail and adapted a fifty year old wooden telescope tripod for macro and landscape work. It's on the heavy side, but compared to my aluminium tripod is steady as a rock at 1:1.

I have Zerene stacker and will get into some studio stacks in the next few days, once I get the flash diffusion set up right.

Aussie Phil
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:53 pm

Post by Aussie Phil »

rjlittlefield wrote:Phil, welcome to image posting! The images look great.

I think your subject is not a true aphid, but one of the (many) related plant hoppers. I don't know your fauna well enough to get closer. The long fibers will be wax, extruded from the cuticle of the insect mostly for defensive purposes.

--Rik
Thank you. :-)

You are quite right regarding the beastie. After some searching I found it to be a brown leafhopper nymph, nicknamed a "hairy bum" here, in typical Oz fashion.

billjanes1
Posts: 88
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2016 1:59 pm
Location: Lake Forest, IL, USA

Re: First ever shot with Micro Nikkor f2.8 55mm AF-S

Post by billjanes1 »

Aussie Phil wrote:Well I just received the first of two 55mm F2.8 AF-S Micro Nikkors I bought on eBay for my D7200.

This one is #37****, which makes it what, somewhere in the late '70s early '80s? I have another one coming that is mid 4*****. Both were very cheap.

Whatever, this one is in mint condition with very clear optics, a lovely smooth focus and clean diaphragm. Extremely happy with it. It's a bit like owning a legend. :-)
Those images are indeed sharp. It may be a good thing that you bought two, since this lens is prone to getting lubrication onto its aperture blades. See here. Scroll down for the review of the 55 mm f/2.8.

I had this lens for a number of years in film days and was quite happy with it and had no problems. Unfortunately, it was stolen or I would still be using it.

Bill

Aussie Phil
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:53 pm

Re: First ever shot with Micro Nikkor f2.8 55mm AF-S

Post by Aussie Phil »

billjanes1 wrote:
Aussie Phil wrote:Well I just received the first of two 55mm F2.8 AF-S Micro Nikkors I bought on eBay for my D7200.

This one is #37****, which makes it what, somewhere in the late '70s early '80s? I have another one coming that is mid 4*****. Both were very cheap.

Whatever, this one is in mint condition with very clear optics, a lovely smooth focus and clean diaphragm. Extremely happy with it. It's a bit like owning a legend. :-)
Those images are indeed sharp. It may be a good thing that you bought two, since this lens is prone to getting lubrication onto its aperture blades. See here. Scroll down for the review of the 55 mm f/2.8.

I had this lens for a number of years in film days and was quite happy with it and had no problems. Unfortunately, it was stolen or I would still be using it.

Bill
Reports of lube in the diaphragm is partly the reason I bought two. Though the problem is not so bad as some make out, I believe. If treated carefully and not left in a hot car on its side they should be OK. Nikon also switched to a different lube after adverse reports. Still, the lenses I bought were cheap enough and it gives me a spare if one needs work, not unusual in such an old lens. The one I now have has been serviced and looks and works a treat. I really am impressed how sharp it is.

Thanks for the link and advice btw.

I've read quite a bit on these now, including websites detailing how to disassemble them for servicing and to clean the diaphragm, so I came across Bjørn Rørslett, who you linked to and even asked him some questions on YouTube, which he nicely replied to.

Here's two links for stripping them down and general info on these early Micro Nikkors for anyone interested:

http://conradhoffman.com/MicroNikkor55.html

https://richardhaw.com/2016/02/22/repai ... f2-8-ai-s/

I was taught lens repair in my teens by a neighbour who was a keen photographer and watch maker/repairer. Still have the tools for it too. Not sure how I'd go on modern lenses, but the oldies are fascinating to work on.

Aussie Phil
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Dec 19, 2016 2:53 pm

Post by Aussie Phil »

Thought I might add a group portrait, taken with the same lens at 1:2 with a hefty crop. I was just trying out a flash diffuser. Handheld, no focus stacking.

Fascinating little guys, I love the way light diffracts on some of the wax "hairs". :)

Still loving this lens. I got the second one yesterday and although it's just as sharp and the optics are clear, there is a hint of lube on the diaphragm and the focusing is notably stiff, especially nearing close focus. Also was a bit grubby on the exterior. I'll strip it down and take care of all that.

Thanks for watching.


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