Leatherback biting fly

Images of undisturbed subjects in their natural environment. All subject types.

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dwight_talley
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 4:53 am
Location: Richmond Virginia
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Leatherback biting fly

Post by dwight_talley »

That is what I will call it. Have no clue as to its real name. It was a test subject for my new procedure using a sheet of poster board to hide my profile as I approached the insect. This was outlined in the "how to sneak up on a dragonfly" posting. It flew off as soon as I removed the poster board shield.

This was taken in my backyard today with a Canon 100mm Macro lens on a 31mm extension tube attached to a Canon ID M III, ISO 1600 1/400 sec F/11.0 Natural Light.
6 shots stacked in Photoshop CS5.

Does anyone know the official name for this insect?

Image
Dwight

theonetruepath
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:38 am

Post by theonetruepath »

Looks like a robber fly.

I like the camo board idea, might be nice to try other finishes like mirror, camo, green etc.
Nikon D800E, 105mm Micro, SB600 remote flashes

dwight_talley
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 4:53 am
Location: Richmond Virginia
Contact:

Post by dwight_talley »

I decided to use a black board because the insect would register a void, nothing much to look at. A mirror would send back too much info that might scare away the insect. I also was thinking about a white poster board to reflect more light on the subject. I will have to give that a try.
Dwight

Eric F
Posts: 246
Joined: Tue Nov 11, 2008 1:38 pm
Location: Sacramento, Calif.

Post by Eric F »

Yes, a robber fly: Promachus rufipes. Interesting technique.

DQE
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Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 1:33 pm
Location: near Portland, Maine, USA

Post by DQE »

I'm really intrigued by your camo board method. I have also wondered if a camo pattern would work better. Perhaps a camo pattern wouldn't appear as camo to bugs? A large single-color panel might appear as an empty and non-threatening entity to bugs...

Some careful experimentation would seem to be in order. On the other hand, if one can suddenly approach bugs that have always been unapproachable certainly gets one's attention!

Perhaps this would work something like a duck blind works for hunters?
-Phil

"Diffraction never sleeps"

dwight_talley
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 4:53 am
Location: Richmond Virginia
Contact:

Post by dwight_talley »

I was able to photograph some moths today that always flew off as soon as they saw I was looking at them. I guess all animals/insects have a system that alerts them when "eyes" are directed at them. Today I was up close with the moths. They did not care I was there.

I wonder if a face mask that blocks out the eyes can also work or is it the shape of the head that causes the flight response?
Dwight

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