Zerene & LR execution on HDD vs. SSD vs. M2 vs. RAM

Have questions about the equipment used for macro- or micro- photography? Post those questions in this forum.

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Adalbert
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2015 1:09 pm

Post by Adalbert »

Hello Mike,
Flash does not help subject movement
yes, it is clear but I cannot imagine, that there are no vibrations in havy setups.
I’m afraid that they are noticeable at 50x or higher.

BR, ADi

mawyatt
Posts: 2479
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:54 pm
Location: Clearwater

Post by mawyatt »

Adalbert wrote:Hello Mike,
Flash does not help subject movement
yes, it is clear but I cannot imagine, that there are no vibrations in havy setups.
I’m afraid that they are noticeable at 50x or higher.

BR, ADi
I've found that having a very stiff setup with multiple levels of vibration attenuation and using EFCS helps, but some residual vibration is always present. Of course the brute force solution is make everything heavy, but an analysis of things can point to solutions that don't necessarily require extremely heavy components. Popular aluminum extrusions are an example of support that has a good stiffness to weight tradeoff, using vibration absorbing materials (Sorbathain), and common-mode techniques can help.

Around here turning the AC and pool pump off, no walking or doors closing, no car traffic or airplanes flying over, so waiting until the very early morning has also helped.

Best,
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

Adalbert
Posts: 1163
Joined: Mon Nov 30, 2015 1:09 pm

Post by Adalbert »

Hi Mike,
My setup bases on a different idea.
The core consisting of the rail with the camera and subject-holder are mounted to the aluminium bar,
which is softly mounted/clamped to the wooden frame.
In this way the transfer of the vibrations from outside is decreased.
https://www.facebook.com/adalbert.mojrz ... 589&type=3
BR, ADi

mawyatt
Posts: 2479
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:54 pm
Location: Clearwater

Post by mawyatt »

Adalbert wrote:Hi Mike,
My setup bases on a different idea.
The core consisting of the rail with the camera and subject-holder are mounted to the aluminium bar,
which is softly mounted/clamped to the wooden frame.
In this way the transfer of the vibrations from outside is decreased.
https://www.facebook.com/adalbert.mojrz ... 589&type=3
BR, ADi
Yes, this is a typical type solution. Going from stiff material to soft, then to stiff is like an electrical equivalent of a Low Pass Filter, this helps attenuate higher frequency vibration components. Having the camera/lens and subject holder mounted to the same stiff aluminum bar is Common-Mode which helps reduce the effects of low frequency vibration components.

These are common techniques employed by most to help deal with vibration, the actual details may differ but the concepts are similar. For example, we've used stiff aluminum extrusions to mount the camera/lens and subject holder (common-mode), then soft vibration absorbing "feet" to support the above, then a stiff but not very heavy base which the feet reside on, then a soft plastic "tub" to support the structure which sits on the floor. So a stiff, soft, stiff, soft arrangement with common-mode. The only thing somewhat special is the use of the Rubbermaid plastic "tubs" to support the setup.

I haven't seen any use of active vibration canceling techniques for our macro setups yet. This is where the vibration is sensed and an actuator is operated to cancel the vibration, similar concept to active noise canceling headphones, and used in very sophisticated applications like semiconductor processing which must maintain nanometer levels of precision.


Best,
Research is like a treasure hunt, you don't know where to look or what you'll find!
~Mike

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