Search found 246 matches

by Eric F
Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:41 am
Forum: Nature Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Robber fly with mite!
Replies: 10
Views: 1657

Kurt,

In female robber flies, the abdomen generally tapers to a more or less pointed structure (the ovipositor). Male abdomens generally end with bulbous genitalia (especially the case with your male Laphria sobria -- the one with the winged ant prey).
by Eric F
Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:58 am
Forum: Nature Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Robber fly with mite!
Replies: 10
Views: 1657

Absolutely beautiful Kurt (though not the mite: too disfiguring)! Yes, this is the female of Laphria (Choerades) sobria -- the male of which I identified for you last year.

Cheers, Eric
by Eric F
Sun Oct 02, 2011 12:13 pm
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Robber fly 3X and 5X with Olympus 38/2.8 Machimus sp. ?
Replies: 16
Views: 3694

Javier, Yes, it could well be a Machimus sp. That is about the largest genus of Asilinae in Europe. But other Asilinae genera could look just like the portions you have shown. Best bet for ID would be to post a full-body, lateral image of a male (if possible), with the genital area in clear focus, o...
by Eric F
Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:35 am
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Robber fly 3X and 5X with Olympus 38/2.8 Machimus sp. ?
Replies: 16
Views: 3694

You guys are too fast for me today; just can't keep up! Yes, just as Rik says. I'll add that these lobes are situated at the inside base of all fly wings and are flexible. When flies fold their wings inward, toward the mid-line of the body, these lobes flex upward -- too make space for the wing base...
by Eric F
Sun Oct 02, 2011 9:21 am
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Robber fly 3X and 5X with Olympus 38/2.8 Machimus sp. ?
Replies: 16
Views: 3694

Fantastic photos Javier! (Wish I could tell you the genus & species of this Asilinae robber fly but can't from these shots alone; too many options.) Chris: do you mean the spoon-shaped structure here , in crop 02? That is the haltere, the remains of the highly-modified 2nd pair of wings, present in ...
by Eric F
Fri Sep 23, 2011 8:36 am
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Blow Flies: the most beautiful of flies
Replies: 10
Views: 4128

More splendid photography NU! I particularly like fig. 7 in your Micscape article: base of the wing, with thorax in the foreground (showing structure of the macrosetae). What are the photo details of this shot?
by Eric F
Tue Sep 20, 2011 8:29 am
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Waves in bronze
Replies: 14
Views: 5609

Wing veins of an insect; not sure which...possibly a leafhopper of some sort?
by Eric F
Tue Aug 16, 2011 5:18 pm
Forum: Equipment Discussions
Topic: Minolta Micro Bellows Lens 12,5mm
Replies: 8
Views: 5016

Hi Caponito, Welcome to Photomacrography! (And: your English is great, though no problem if it wasn't...) Congratulations on getting the little Minolta 12.5 lens. I have one, and I find it to be very sharp . I use it only in the lab, on a stand; the working distance is quite short (5 - 8mm) but the ...
by Eric F
Thu Aug 11, 2011 5:29 pm
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Hippoboscid parasitic fly with hitch-hikers
Replies: 9
Views: 2055

From just the head, it looks like a Hippoboscidae. These flies are parasites of birds and mammals. Most species have wings but some are wingless -- like the "sheep ked" -- which is a parasite of sheep, and is common in Europe and elsewhere.
by Eric F
Tue Jul 12, 2011 9:26 pm
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Sawfly mimic? Soldier fly [Beris vallata]
Replies: 3
Views: 878

Very nice fly Laurie! Definitely a soldier fly (Stratiomyiidae); I showed your images to my friend Martin Hauser (an expert on this family, plus other kinds of flies too...), who informed me it is Beris vallata.

Cheers,

Eric
by Eric F
Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:46 pm
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: A tick (Ixodes ricinus)
Replies: 2
Views: 1155

Mitch,

The day-long treatments of both Lactic acid and KOH have helped to clear the cuticle of the tick to a great extent, as well as eliminate lots of "extraneous" internal tissue. That is the purpose of these treatments: to prepare the specimen for clear viewing on a slide.

Eric
by Eric F
Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:55 pm
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: ENT 101- female moth genitalia
Replies: 15
Views: 3505

I think in the moth world, it would be "bursa copulatrix" (for the female...). Very nice images NU.
by Eric F
Fri May 27, 2011 3:50 pm
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: small fly with beautiful eyes
Replies: 5
Views: 1053

Wow! Fabulous work Yeatzee -- quite a beautiful fly. Yes, it is a fruit fly relative: Pogonortalis doclea , family Platystomatidae. A photo of this fly was shown in photomacrography before ( HERE : photo at top of pg. 5, blurb on ID below). The fly is a native of Australia but hangs-out in Californi...
by Eric F
Tue May 24, 2011 5:18 pm
Forum: Photography Through the Microscope
Topic: Mosquito wing II epi, iridescence
Replies: 7
Views: 6059

Fabulous Charles! I believe you have just independently discovered a new and exciting method, called the "Wing Interference Pattern" (WIP), that helps discriminate between species of flies (and other insects) -- which was announced in 2010 (see HERE ). And -- not surprising to us -- you have improve...
by Eric F
Tue May 17, 2011 8:58 am
Forum: Technical and Studio Photography -- Macro and Close-up
Topic: Predatory fly
Replies: 22
Views: 3269

Yes, your stacking is coming along very nicely Tanner! I believe your little predatory fly is a Muscidae in the genus Coenosia (possibly C. tigrina ). You will be interested in a fascinating report on this genus, published a few years ago by Martin Suvak: "Coenosia attenuata can behave like a falcon...