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What subject to photograph for lens testing?

 
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Planapo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Germany, in the United States of Europe

PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 3:31 am    Post subject: What subject to photograph for lens testing? Reply with quote

As said before, I´m going to test some cine lenses for macro, reversed on bellows .
What would you recommend as a handy test subject to photograph to find out how the lenses perform and to compare one and the same lens at different aperture settings?
And btw, where should I turn the focus ring on these lenses? I would assume to maximum near.

Thanks,
Betty
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rjlittlefield
Site Admin


Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 19966
Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2008 9:09 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Moth wing. Mount it flat and in focus plane as much as possible. Shoot a short stack with electronic flash so you don't have to worry about vibration. Use lots of diffusion to avoid specular reflections that are mismatched between tests. Be sure to save the wing -- you'll want it later for more tests.

Maximum near focus is always safe. But with most lenses it really doesn't matter because they have no floating elements. The whole lens moves as a unit to focus, so there is no optical difference between turning the ring and changing the bellows extension.

--Rik
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Planapo



Joined: 07 Nov 2006
Posts: 1533
Location: Germany, in the United States of Europe

PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2008 9:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks Rik, for your good suggestion.

I was trying to get hold of a moth during the last two nights with a big white sheet backlit on our backyard balcony but, darn ... none showed up. Maybe it´s still too cold after sunset. But sooner or later I will find one.

Betty
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Charles Krebs



Joined: 01 Aug 2006
Posts: 5805
Location: Issaquah, WA USA

PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2008 10:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with Rik, but I have one caveat. I have come across certain moth wings (usually small scales, dull brown color) that I just can't seem to photograph to show good detail. (I really should put one on the compound scope at very high mag just to see if I can see some unusual surface texture or other characteristic that might cause this). I generally use a mounted butterfly wing that has served well for this purpose, but many (most?) moth wings work just as well.
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