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Handheld Stack - Green-veined white
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iain



Joined: 02 Apr 2014
Posts: 56

PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 1:19 pm    Post subject: Handheld Stack - Green-veined white Reply with quote

here's another handheld stack - this time it's a green-veined white hiding behind the daffodils - 52 images 1/125 @ f5.6



thanks for looking

Iain
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Lou Jost



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 2:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How the heck do you do that?
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iain



Joined: 02 Apr 2014
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 19, 2017 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lou Jost wrote:
How the heck do you do that?


I actually discovered this technique more by accident than design - about 6 years ago I forgot to take my flash when I was out on a field trip so used stacking as the alternative - I've never used flash since.

Probably easiest to demonstrate with this video of me taking a stack of an Empid type creature

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W_9m0nBFCk

be warned, it's not a very exciting video...
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davholla



Joined: 26 Apr 2016
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 4:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

iain wrote:
Lou Jost wrote:
How the heck do you do that?


I actually discovered this technique more by accident than design - about 6 years ago I forgot to take my flash when I was out on a field trip so used stacking as the alternative - I've never used flash since.

Probably easiest to demonstrate with this video of me taking a stack of an Empid type creature

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8W_9m0nBFCk

be warned, it's not a very exciting video...

Talk about a happy accident - I am going to have to try to copy this.
However I have one question - in the video you are leaning on the ground. How does it work if you cannot lean on the ground? How do you do it then or is there something I am missing?
Also do you need good light for this to work without flash?
(I have a 7DMKII and MPE and usually use f9 250/s with flash but obviously I will try your settings).
BTW this one
http://www.photomacrography.net/forum/viewtopic.php?t=33855
I doubt could have been better using a dead specimen and something automated.
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zzffnn



Joined: 22 May 2014
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 4:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Amazing!
Does that stability require photographer and camera to lay down on the ground?
Thank you for sharing!
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Troels



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Location: Denmark, Engesvang

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 5:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Beautiful picture and amazing skills.

Troels
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Lou Jost



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 5:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lesser mortals might find that the Olympus or Panasonic in-camera focus-bracketing is a good alternative solution. It is an order of magnitude faster and doesn't require controlled movements.
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davholla



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 11:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

One other question how do you work out where to start and end the stack?
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rjlittlefield
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Joined: 01 Aug 2006
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Location: Richland, Washington State, USA

PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 12:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

davholla wrote:
how do you work out where to start and end the stack?

On the surface this sounds like a question of composition. You're looking through the viewfinder so you start at or before the first thing you want to have in focus, and end at or after the last thing.

But I think you may be asking some deeper question. If so, can you explain in more detail what you're wondering about?

--Rik
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iain



Joined: 02 Apr 2014
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

davholla wrote:
However I have one question - in the video you are leaning on the ground. How does it work if you cannot lean on the ground? How do you do it then or is there something I am missing?
Also do you need good light for this to work without flash?


zzffnn wrote:
Does that stability require photographer and camera to lay down on the ground?


When deciding whether to stack or not, I make a pretty quick assessment of whether it's worth my while (will it likely be successful). If it's too awkward I'll go and look for some more suitable creature - there's nothing to setup so I'm not really investing any time and it's easy enough for me just to move on to something easier. Generally I'm looking for a situation where I'm able to stabilise the camera in some manner.

As regards light I tend to favour overcast days as it gives better lighting - I've never really found lighting to be a problem - it's a bit similar to the above, if it's too dark then I won't bother trying it - I'm quite happy to go and have a cup of tea and wait for the right conditions (overcast, grey days are good - plenty of these kind of days in Scotland)


Last edited by iain on Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:54 pm; edited 1 time in total
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iain



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 1:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
davholla wrote:
how do you work out where to start and end the stack?

On the surface this sounds like a question of composition. You're looking through the viewfinder so you start at or before the first thing you want to have in focus, and end at or after the last thing.

But I think you may be asking some deeper question. If so, can you explain in more detail what you're wondering about?

--Rik


Yes, I think Rik has pretty much answered this one - also, it can be helpful to increase the dof (f11 ish) on the 1st and last shots of the stack to improve the focus transition from in focus to out of focus although I have to confess I'm pretty rubbish at remembering to do this...
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Lou Jost



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 2:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you try this with the Olympus, you set the desired number of images to some arbitrary high number (do this in advance, once, no need to set it again), and then press the shutter button once to start, and again to stop when it looks "done".
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davholla



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rjlittlefield wrote:
davholla wrote:
how do you work out where to start and end the stack?

On the surface this sounds like a question of composition. You're looking through the viewfinder so you start at or before the first thing you want to have in focus, and end at or after the last thing.

But I think you may be asking some deeper question. If so, can you explain in more detail what you're wondering about?

--Rik

What I meant was that in a stack you start with one bit in focus and then another until you have x images which all have some in focus.
So how do you work out which bit to have in focus in your first one and when to stop.
I am sorry if this is not clear.
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davholla



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PostPosted: Thu Apr 20, 2017 10:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

iain wrote:
davholla wrote:
However I have one question - in the video you are leaning on the ground. How does it work if you cannot lean on the ground? How do you do it then or is there something I am missing?
Also do you need good light for this to work without flash?


zzffnn wrote:
Does that stability require photographer and camera to lay down on the ground?


When deciding whether to stack or not, I make a pretty quick assessment of whether it's worth my while (will it likely be successful). If it's too awkward I'll go and look for some more suitable creature - there's nothing to setup so I'm not really investing any time and it's easy enough for me just to move on to something easier. Generally I'm looking for a situation where I'm able to stabilise the camera in some manner.

As regards light I tend to favour overcast days as it gives better lighting - I've never really found lighting to be a problem - it's a bit similar to the above, if it's too dark then I won't bother trying it - I'm quite happy to go and have a cup of tea and wait for the right conditions (overcast, grey days are good - plenty of these kind of days in Scotland)

Thanks for that. I took this photo of a fly on a bush and there was NOTHING to support myself on, so your technique wouldn't have worked in that case, if I understand you correctly
Fly IMG_0984 by davholla2002, on Flickr

Saying that it looks a great idea, I tried last night on a stick insect and will try again.

Does this work at higher magnifications e.g 4x +?
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iain



Joined: 02 Apr 2014
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PostPosted: Fri Apr 21, 2017 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

davholla wrote:
Thanks for that. I took this photo of a fly on a bush and there was NOTHING to support myself on, so your technique wouldn't have worked in that case, if I understand you correctly

Does this work at higher magnifications e.g 4x +?


to be honest I would assess the situation and decide whether it was worth the effort - if it was some insect I'd never seen before and there was nothing to aid stability then I'd certainly give it a shot (well, several shots if I'm stacking). I've certainly managed to do this in the past but usually with larger insects which does make things easier. So I would never say it can't be done - just that perhaps some situations may be more challenging than others.

Works fine at higher magnifications but you'll need to be cautious of not missing a slice or 2 as this tends to require a much wider aperture (and so less dof) per each image
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